Fighting for Fair Elections and Public Campaign Financing

New York badly needs to combat the influence that big-money interests exert on State government – and I’m fighting to change the system.

Gottfried and Rivera make the case for single-payer health care

If the New York Health Act were to become law, it would revolutionize health care in the United States. No state has ever successfully implemented a single-payer system at such a scale, but the chairs of the Assembly and state Senate health committees say it can be done. City & State caught up with Assemblyman Richard Gottfried and state Sen. Gustavo Rivera to discuss the bills they are sponsoring in their respective chambers and how they think the proposal can make its way through the Legislature.

Crain’s: Assembly and Senate propose restoration of Medicaid funding

The Assembly and state Senate on Tuesday released details of their budget proposals, restoring $550 million in Medicaid funding that Gov. Andrew Cuomo had stripped from his spending plan after a downward revision in expected tax revenue.

Times-Union: Hospitals, providers urge N.Y. lawmakers to restore Cuomo health care cuts

Health care workers, leaders and advocates swarmed the state Capitol Tuesday to urge lawmakers to restore $550 million in funds that were slashed from the governor’s original budget proposal to help plug a
larger than expected revenue shortfall.

Chanting “Don’t cut health care” and holding signs that said “Some cuts never heal,” hundreds of health care workers converged at the Empire State Plaza from all around the state and then marched to the Capitol, packing Albany’s normally busy downtown with off-duty ambulances, buses and foot traffic.

The Nation: “Richard Gottfried’s Health Care Crusade Is Paying Off”

Two posters hang on the door of New York State Assembly member Richard Gottfried’s Albany office. One has a picture of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., underneath a quote: “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.” The other says “Healthcare is a Human Right!” and urges the reader to “Pass the New York Health Act.”

Gay City News: New Push to Decriminalize Sex Work in New York State

More than 20 groups — including several LGBTQ organizations — and a handful of local politicians are joining forces with DecrimNY, a new coalition of sex workers and advocates focused on “decriminal­izing, decarcerating, and destigmati­zing” their lives and livelihoods. The coalition kicked off on Monday during a press conference with advocates and politicians.

The Appeal: ‘The Police Act Like We Are Nothing’

Part of the group’s approach involves pushing for legislation in Albany, with allies like State Senators Jessica Ramos, Julia Salazar, Brad Hoylman, and Assembly Member Richard Gottfried. Those lawmakers plan to introduce a comprehensive decriminalization bill to remove criminal penalties for “consensual sexual exchange between adults.” The coalition also urges quick passage of two bills already introduced in the state legislature that are getting newfound support.

Single-payer healthcare campaign kicks off in Albany

A broad coalition of seniors, people with disabilities, caregivers, home care providers and advocates joined the bills’ sponsors, Assemblyman Richard Gottfried and Sen. Gustavo Rivera, as they kicked off a 2019 New York Health Act push at the state Capitol on Monday.

WXXI: Single-payer sponsors release new, revised plan

Sponsors of a measure to create a single-payer health care system in New York have offered a revised bill, but its future is uncertain. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state might not be able to afford it.

Assembly sponsor Richard Gottfried, who has championed the issue of single-payer
for several years, said the bill, known as the New York Health Act, has now been amended to include coverage for long-term health care, including home health aides and nursing homes.

Times-Union: NY lawmakers voice vaping, single-payer concerns

ALBANY — New York’s top health officials told lawmakers Tuesday they are unsure how an unexpected $2.3 billion state budget shortfall next year might impact their budgets.