Tag hearings

El Diario: Debaten ley de muerte asistida en la ciudad de Nueva York

By Pedro Frisneda, May 3

Quizás, aparte del aborto y la marihuana medicinal, no existe otro tema médico y de salud más polémico y controversial que el de la muerte asistida.

Esto quedó muy claro, este jueves, durante la primera audiencia pública que se realiza en la ciudad de Nueva York sobre una legislación estatal que, de ser aprobada, permitiría a enfermos terminales –que sean adultos mentalmente competentes–, la opción de solicitar ayuda médica para morir.

Durante la audiencia, organizada por el Comité de Salud de la Asamblea Estatal de Nueva York, que tiene en sus manos la responsabilidad de aprobar el anteproyecto antes de que pase al pleno de la Asamblea Estatal,  los neoyorquinos tuvieron la oportunidad de escuchar los diferentes puntos de vista y argumentos de medio centenar de personas que expusieron su apoyo o rechazo a la legislación.

Tal como lo plantea el proyecto de ley A-2383-A, conocido como ‘Medical Aid in Dying Act‘ (Ayuda Médica para Morir),  que fue patrocinado por la asambleísta Amy Paulin (D-Westchester), los neoyorquinos adultos con enfermedades mortales  –como los que tiene cáncer en estado terminal–, y que estén en pleno juicio, tendrían la opción de solicitar a un doctor una prescripción  para un medicamento que puedan tomar por sí mismo y  que les permita morir pacíficamente mientras duermen, si su sufrimiento y dolor se vuelven insoportables.

Capitol Pressroom: Medical Aid in Dying (Audio)

On April 23, I joined Assembly Member Amy Paulin on Capitol Pressroom to discuss Medical Aid in Dying:  Audio here.

News 10 Albany: NY Assembly hearing held on aid in dying (with video)

By Morgan McKay, 4/23/18 (video at link)

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – The New York Assembly heard testimony that will decide if they should proceed with legislation that would allow for medical aid in dying or physician-assisted suicide.

“They should have had the right to choose,” Janet Duprey, Former Republican Assemblywoman from Plattsburgh, said.

Duprey says her mother suffered a series of strokes and eventually requested for her feeding tube to be removed.

“She did not want the feeding tube reinserted, she simply wanted to die. It took her 11 days to starve to death.

For this reason, Duprey and a large crowd in yellow shirts came to the Assembly hearing to show their support for medical aid in dying legislation.

Associated Press: Legislative hearing on aid-in-dying bill attracts big crowds

By David Klepper, 4/27

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Hundreds of people on both sides of the debate over physician-assisted suicide traveled to Albany on Monday for a hearing on legislation that would allow people with a terminal illness to request life-ending medication from a doctor.

The measure has been discussed for years in the state Capitol but faces significant legislative opposition and isn’t expected to pass before lawmakers adjourn their session in June. But supporters insist they’re gaining momentum as other states adopt similar laws. Colorado, Washington, Vermont, California, Oregon, Montana, Hawaii and Washington D.C. allow people to seek a doctor’s help in ending their life.

Under the proposal, which is based on Oregon’s 21-year-old law, a person with a terminal illness and a life expectancy of six months or less could obtain life-ending medication if at least two doctors agree with their prognosis and determine they are of sound mind.

Gay City News: Assembly holds hearing on legalizing pot

By Nathan Riley, January 18

BY NATHAN RILEY | Demanding that New York State stop racist law enforcement patterns by legalizing adult use of marijuana, advocates told members of the State Assembly, including Health Committee chair Richard N. Gottfried, a Chelsea Democrat, that police stops are traumatizing black and brown New Yorkers.

At a January 11 hearing in Lower Manhattan, speaker after speaker insisted that being searched, handcuffed, marched into court, and chained to other arrestees in the morning is often traumatizing.

“Marijuana decriminalization has fallen short and will continue to do so,” Kassandra Frederique, the New York State director of the Drug Policy Alliance, contended.

Even with reductions in stop and frisk, it remains up to the police officer to distinguish between private possession and possession in public view, which can trigger a criminal arrest. Those nabbed, overwhelmingly black and Latino New Yorkers, are fingerprinted and given retinal scans. Police officers have no immediate way of knowing if their victim faces deportation or loss of a job or a scholarship, but no matter what the arrestee is left cowed and confused.

Fox 5 NY: Legal marijuana in New York? Lawmakers hold hearing

By Jessica Formoso, January 11 (with video)

– The New York State Assembly held a public hearing Thursday to discuss the proposed Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act, a bill that would legalize the production, distribution, and use of marijuana for adults over 21.

Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, the chair of the health committee, said several states now tax and regulate recreational marijuana.

“I think that’s long overdue here in New York,” he said.

Over the past 20 years, more than 800,000 people in New York State have been arrested for possessing small amounts of marijuana.

“In New York City in 2016, 18,000 arrests for marijuana procession alone,” the Law Enforcement Action Partnership’s Neill Franklin said. “$325 a day to incarcerate somebody in the city. That’s a lot of money.”

Crain’s: What should marijuana legalization look like in New York?

By Caroline Lewis, February 12

Although it’s uncertain if a bill to tax and regulate marijuana like alcohol could become law in New York, a state Assembly hearing Thursday showed that lawmakers are taking the prospect of legalizing “adult use” seriously.

Rather than simply focusing on whether the state should end the prohibition of recreational marijuana, Assembly members asked pointed questions about what legalization should look like.

Advocates from the Drug Policy Alliance, Vocal-NY and a range of other advocacy groups said that full legalization in New York should address the harm that prohibition has caused to communities of color, whose members are disproportionately arrested for marijuana possession. One approach is to proactively diversify license recipients.

AM New York: Marijuana legalization debated by New York State Assembly

By Ivan Pereira, January 11

Lawmakers had the dubious task Thursday of opening the floor to arguments for the legalization of marijuana in New York.

In light of growing national support over for legalizing pot — a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday found that 58 percent of Americans want it decriminalized — State Assemb. Richard Gottfried, who chairs the assembly’s health committee, said the state needed to take a serious look at its antiquated drug enforcement laws.

“We want to hear from a diverse group” Gottfried said.

City & State: Legislation could provide more funding to adult home care providers in exchange for quality of care improvements

By Dan Rosenblum, October 19

Adult home care providers are urging Gov. Andrew Cuomo to sign a bill that would increase subsidies for those who house and care for seniors and adults with disabilities. Advocates for residents say any subsidy boost should be tied to additional oversight measures to guard against excessive salaries for facility managers, poor quality programs and fiscal mismanagement.

Press Advisory – 9/19 Adult Home Hearing

Contact:                                                     For Immediate Release

Mischa Sogut                                              September 18, 2017

(518) 455-4941
SogutM@nyassembly.gov

PRESS ADVISORY

Ensuring Adult Home Safety & Quality:  
Assembly Public Hearing Will Review Quality, Oversight,
Funding of Adult Homes

On Tuesday, September 19, the Assembly Committees on Health, Aging, and Social Services will hold a public hearing in New York City on safety and quality of adult homes (“adult care facilities”)  A second will be held in Syracuse on September 28 at 11 AM at the John J. Hughes State Office Building.

Adult homes house both aging individuals and those with complex medical or mental health needs, providing supportive services for independent living.  They offer services less medical than nursing homes or enhanced assisted living, but more so than senior living.  Adult homes are funded largely by Medicaid and the New York State Supplement Program (SSP), which provides financial support to the aged and disabled.  Advocates are concerned that the current SSP rate is too low, shortchanging facilities and affecting quality of care.

The hearing will examine the availability and quality of adult home services, including the impact of increased funding for such programs.  Witnesses are expected to include adult home residents, advocates, and operators.

What:

NYS Assembly public hearing on adult homes

Who:

-NYS Assembly Committees on Health, Aging, and Social Services
-Adult home residents
-Resident advocates including self-advocates
-Adult home operators

Where:
Assembly Hearing Room
19th Floor
250 Broadway

New York, NY 10007

The hearing will also be webcast live at:

http://assembly.state.ny.us/av/

When:

Tuesday, September 19
11 AM

###