Tag long term care

Press Advisory – 9/19 Adult Home Hearing

Contact:                                                     For Immediate Release

Mischa Sogut                                              September 18, 2017

(518) 455-4941
SogutM@nyassembly.gov

PRESS ADVISORY

Ensuring Adult Home Safety & Quality:  
Assembly Public Hearing Will Review Quality, Oversight,
Funding of Adult Homes

On Tuesday, September 19, the Assembly Committees on Health, Aging, and Social Services will hold a public hearing in New York City on safety and quality of adult homes (“adult care facilities”)  A second will be held in Syracuse on September 28 at 11 AM at the John J. Hughes State Office Building.

Adult homes house both aging individuals and those with complex medical or mental health needs, providing supportive services for independent living.  They offer services less medical than nursing homes or enhanced assisted living, but more so than senior living.  Adult homes are funded largely by Medicaid and the New York State Supplement Program (SSP), which provides financial support to the aged and disabled.  Advocates are concerned that the current SSP rate is too low, shortchanging facilities and affecting quality of care.

The hearing will examine the availability and quality of adult home services, including the impact of increased funding for such programs.  Witnesses are expected to include adult home residents, advocates, and operators.

What:

NYS Assembly public hearing on adult homes

Who:

-NYS Assembly Committees on Health, Aging, and Social Services
-Adult home residents
-Resident advocates including self-advocates
-Adult home operators

Where:
Assembly Hearing Room
19th Floor
250 Broadway

New York, NY 10007

The hearing will also be webcast live at:

http://assembly.state.ny.us/av/

When:

Tuesday, September 19
11 AM

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Budget Update: Medicaid Long-Term Care

It has been becoming increasingly difficult for Medicaid patients needing long-term care – especially home care for extended hours – to get the care they need.  In many areas, there is a shortage of home care aides because low reimbursement rates make recruitment and retention of workers difficult.  State payment rates to managed care plans discourage them from serving high-need patients properly.  The methodology for assessing patient need does not adequately account for cognitive deficiency and other factors.

The newly-enacted state budget legislation (A.3007-B) includes several important actions intended to begin to turn around this siutation.  In addition, the Department of Health (DOH) sent a side letter to the legislature committing to several further actions (indicated below as “Administrative action, side letter”).

  • Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program (CDPAP) fiscal intermediary authorization: Requires fiscal intermediaries in the CDPAP program to register with DOH (“authorization”), and defines their scope of services.  In 2015, similar legislation was vetoed and this year’s legislation comes from negotiation among the Assembly and Senate Health Committees, DOH, and the fiscal intermediaries.
  • CDPAP wage parity: Adds workers in the CDPAP program to the Medicaid wage parity law that currently applies to other home care workers, primarily in the downstate metropolitan region.  It will phase in to reach full parity in three years. Medicaid payments to managed care plans will cover this, and managed care plans will attest to the wage pass-through in cost reports.
  • Uniform assessment system (UAS):  
  • Adds “cognitive” to the current evaluation of patient “medical, social and environmental needs” required for managed care enrollees. Because of a drafting error, this provision is found in the “revenue” budget bill (A.3009-C, Part GGG) rather than in the “health” budget bill (A.3007-B).
  • DOH will hold regular meetings with legislators, stakeholders, and the UAS program team in order to examine and formulate improvements to the UAS. (Administrative action, see side-letter)
  • High-need rate cells or risk adjustments for managed long term care: (Administrative action, see side-letter.) DOH will work with legislators,  advocates, providers, and managed care organizations to evaluate separate rate cells or risk adjustments for the nursing home, high-cost/high-need home and personal care, and Health and Recovery Plan (HARP) populations.  Resulting adjustments will require approval by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
  • Delaying TBI/NHTD carve-in to managed care: (Administrative action, see side-letter.) DOH will further delay the carve-in of the Traumatic Brain Injury and Nursing Home Transition and Diversion waivers into managed care from April 1, 2018 to January 1, 2019.
  • Nursing home bed-hold: The legislature restored the bed-hold payments for therapeutic leaves of absence at a 95% payment rate for up to 14 days annually.
  • Nursing home benchmark rates: The transitional “benchmark” Medicaid payment rate for nursing homes patients moving from fee-for-service to managed care will be extended until 2020.
  • Managed Long-Term Care (MLTC) and Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) transportation: (Administrative action, see side-letter.) DOH will not carve-out the Medicaid transportation benefit from MLTC or ADHC programs for the 2017-2018 fiscal year.
  • Spousal and family support: The Legislature protected the resources of family members by rejecting the Governor’s proposal to require them to pay for an individual’s long-term care before the individual could become Medicaid eligible. This was the 28th consecutive year that this has been proposed by five governors and rejected by the Legislature.

PRESS RELEASE: Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act Passes Assembly

PRESS RELEASE

“Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act” Passes Assembly

Bill Sets Standards for Adequate Hospital, Nursing Home Staffing

(6/14/16 – Albany)  The New York State Assembly today passed the “Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act” (A8580A/S782) with bi-partisan support.  The bill would set a maximum number of patients that nurses and other “direct care staff” can care for in hospitals and nursing homes (staffing ratios) and was based on peer-reviewed academic and evidence-based recommendations.

“Safe staffing is a critical step to ensuring the safety of patients and the safety of nurses,” said Assembly Member Aileen Gunther, the lead sponsor of the bill. “Study after study has shown that investments made in nurses are good investments – whether it’s ending mandatory overtime, requiring safe patient handling policies, or setting safe staffing ratios. As our system of care is evolving, patient outcomes are a key factor in determining provider payments. Safe staffing will improve outcomes, save money, and save lives.”

“Safe staffing saves lives, improves outcomes and reduces avoidable patient injuries,” said Assembly Health Committee Chair Richard N. Gottfried.  “Research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) determined the odds of patient death increased by 7% for each additional patient the nurse must care for at one time.  The ratios and hours specified in this bill are based on peer-reviewed and evidence-based recommendations, and will ensure that hospitals and nursing homes are safer and provide higher quality care.”

Politico NY: State wage hike intensifies staffing challenge for health care providers

By Dan Goldberg, 3/15

Dan Brown was having trouble hiring.

Thousands of developmentally disabled men and women in the Southern Tier live in the ranch-style homes that Brown’s organization operates or rely on the community services it provides. They count on the staff at the Franziska Racker Centers to help them live full lives, whether that means driving them to museums or helping them learn to buy groceries.

But the Racker Centers’ vacancy rate had nearly doubled over the course of a year to 17 percent. Job candidates would schedule interviews but wouldn’t show.

Brown suspected he knew why.

Public Hearing 10/8: Brain Injury Services

ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE ON HEALTH
Richard N. Gottfried, Chair
ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE ON MENTAL HEALTH & DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
Aileen M. Gunther, Chair
ASSEMBLY TASK FORCE ON PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
David I. Weprin, Chair

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

SUBJECT: Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment and Services

Albany, NY
Thursday, October 8
10:30 AM
Legislative Office Building, Hearing Room C

Every year, traumatic brain injury (TBI) (injury to the brain or skull caused by an external force) results in more than 2,000 deaths, 19,000 hospital admissions, and over 100,000 emergency department visits in New York. Thousands of New Yorkers, young and old alike, live with brain injury and its consequences, including complex and unique cases in which symptoms may not have been noticed at first or weren’t considered “traumatic” at the time of injury. While many of these patients receive health care services in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, it is likely that some portion of individuals are not diagnosed or evaluated for services from which they could benefit. Emerging science on brain injury – its prevalence, causes, and effects – complicates the picture even further.

May Health Committee Update

Assembly Health Committee Update:
Protecting Nursing Home Residents From Abuse of Psychotropic Drugs

The Assembly Committee on Health favorably reported 39 bills at its meetings in May.  The Committee advanced legislation strengthening the “prescriber prevails” rule in Medicaid Managed Care; authorizing community paramedicine; and protecting nursing home residents from overuse of psychotropic drugs.

New York law gives patients in nursing homes the right to be fully informed of their proposed treatment, including the right to refuse treatment and be free from chemical restraint unless consistent with certain requirements.  However, psychotropic drugs are being used not just to treat illness but as a form of behavioral control.  The Assembly Health Committee held a hearing in February in which patients’ families, advocates, and adult care experts testified to the frequency of overuse.  A.7351 (Gottfried) requires that before psychotropic drugs are ordered in a nursing home or adult care facility, the patient or their surrogate must be informed of the potential benefits and side effects; dosage and duration of the prescription; reasonable alternatives (such as therapeutic activities); and their right to refuse consent.  The bill also requires written consent by the patient or surrogate.

For more information on a particular bill, please contact the sponsor listed after the description.  For the text of a bill, supporting memorandum, and information on its status, go to: http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us/menuf.cgi .

Tuesday, May 5

Early Intervention Covered Lives Assessment – Provides funding for Early Intervention services through the “covered lives assessment” paid by health insurance companies.  (A273, Paulin)

Credentialing for Group Practices – Requires insurers to expedite review of applications of health care professionals who are joining a group practice and grant provisional credentials to these professionals (A501, Cusick)

Healthy Teens Act – Establishes a Department of Health grant program for providers of age-appropriate sex education.  (A1616, Gottfried)

Health Committee Update – 2/27

Assembly Health Committee Update
New York Health Act reported from committee

 The Assembly Committee on Health favorably reported 22 bills at its meetings on Tuesday, February 10, and Thursday, February 26, 2015, including legislation giving adoptees access to their birth certificates and medical records, restoring “prescriber prevails” in Medicaid managed care, and creating the New York Health universal health coverage plan.

Press Advisory – NYC Hearing on Antipsychotic Drugs in Nursing Homes

Contact:
Mischa Sogut (Gottfried), (518) 455-4941, Sogutm@nysa.us
Richard Mollot (Long Term Care Community Coalition), (212) 385-0356, richard@ltccc.org

For Immediate Release

PRESS ADVISORY

Drugging Nursing Home Residents:
Assembly Health Committee Hearing on Antipsychotic Drugs
in Nursing Homes

Each day in New York, nearly one in five nursing home residents is medicated with powerful and dangerous antipsychotic drugs as a form of “chemical restraint,” according to data from the federal Nursing Home Compare website.

On Wednesday, February 18, the New York State Assembly Health Committee will hold a hearing on the use of antipsychotic drugs in nursing homes.  A recent report by the Long Term Care Community Coalition (LTCCC), an advocacy group for the elderly and disabled, shows alarming above-average antipsychotic drug usage rates in some regions of the state and in many nursing homes.

This hearing will include sworn testimony by representatives of residents, families, advocates and providers, voicing their observations and making recommendations.

What:
Public hearing on the use of antipsychotic drugs in nursing homes

Who:
-Assembly Health Committee Chair Richard N. Gottfried
-Representatives of nursing home residents
-Patient advocates
-Provider agencies
-Legal analysts

Where:
250 Broadway, Hearing Room 1923, New York, NY

When:
Wednesday, February 18, 10 AM

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