Tag single-payer

Gotham Gazette: Amid Health Care Funding Fights, Cuomo Explores Special Session

By Rachel Silberstein, October 12

Governor Andrew Cuomo has been floating the idea of a special legislative session to address federal cuts to the state’s health care programs, as well as other concerns that have developed, since the state budget was agreed to in April.

In that budget, Cuomo pushed to include and won a provision granting him nearly unilateral power to adjust the state’s financial plan mid-year in the event of at least $800 million in federal cuts to the state. In April, the governor said the provision would ensure that “we do not overcommit ourselves financially” and indicated it allowed him to sign off on a budget that did not otherwise account for likely federal cuts. But, it appears as if Cuomo may call lawmakers back to Albany — likely with agreement from the legislative majorities to an agenda — regardless of whether the threshold has been met.

Adirondack Almanac: North Country Looks At Single-Payer Health Care

By Bill Quinlivan, October 7

Recently, residents from around the North Country assembled in the Long Lake Town Hall to hear and participate in a meeting dedicated to better understanding the New York Health Act, the projected savings for Adirondack communities of this single-payer health-insurance program and where it currently stands in the state legislature.

Dr. Jack Carney of the North Country Access to Health Care Committee and member of the Long Lake Alliance moderated the evening’s program.  The program featured Dr. Andrew Coates as the keynote speaker.  Dr. Coates is assistant professor of medicine and psychiatry at Albany Medical College and past president of Physicians for a National Health Plan.

City & State: State single-payer health care could be supported by Cuomo

By Grace Segers, October 5

Last month, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, the once and perhaps future presidential candidate, unveiled legislation to create a single-payer health care system. U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, another potential presidential candidate in 2020, was one of 16 senators to sign on as a co-sponsor of the Medicare for All Act. And Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who’s also on short lists of likely Democratic presidential contenders, offered his support for the proposal as well.

In an interview on WNYC’s “The Brian Lehrer Show,” Cuomo called the federal plan, which would make health care universal and publicly funded by the taxpayer, “a good idea.”

Truthout: As GOP Attacks Health Care, Movement for Single-Payer Grows Across Country

By Michael Corcoran, 9/26

As Republicans seek to throw millions of Americans off insurance this week, progressives are, once again, playing defense. Activists are going full bore to stop the Cassidy-Graham bill, which is opposed by virtually every health organization of significance. The legislation, which grows more contemptible with each passing day, would lead to about 41,600 deaths a year, according to a report released yesterday by the Annals of Internal Medicine.

“We cannot be silent while Congress plays political games with the lives of our patients,” said Dr. Carol Paris, president of Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), in a statement sent to Truthout.

Indeed, the GOP’s frightening efforts are a reminder why it is vital to have a movement for health care justice that seeks to end the commodification of health care, one way or another.

The good news is that this movement is growing, as is evident from the fiery opposition to Trumpcare. And this movement is fueling growing momentum for single-payer health care, not only with Bernie Sanders’ Medicare for All bill, but also across the states. Passing a statewide plan has proven difficult, with recent efforts in several states either killed or stalled. These disappointments have been a source of frustration for advocates and cannon fodder for the for-profit health industry. It has become almost impossible to read a critique of single-payer without a talking point like: If it didn’t work in Vermont, how could it work anywhere?

However, these arguments are deeply flawed and misrepresent not only the battle over statewide health care in Vermont, but also how single-payer works at any level. The failures to win universal care in Vermont and Colorado are indeed considerable setbacks. But do they reflect systemic reasons why a public, universal health care system is impossible? Is the fight for a statewide system under these principles dead?

Not according to organizers, legislators and medical professionals in five states who spoke with Truthout. Despite setbacks, these organizers continue to advance the cause of health care justice. Their approaches include increased grassroots pressure (in California and New York), new policies which aim to build toward universal care one sector at a time (Vermont), and efforts to measure the impacts of single-payer in real time (Massachusetts) to better understand and educate stakeholders about the impacts of the policy.

Times-Union: Cuomo signals support for single-payer health care

By Matthew Hamilton, 9/19/17

ALBANY – Gov. Andrew Cuomo signaled support of single-payer health care at both the federal and state levels on Monday as Democrats nationwide rally around the issue.

“I think that would be a good idea,” Cuomo said on WNYC’s “The Brian Lehrer Show” when asked about a federal “Medicare for All” system.

But single-payer may face a roadblock from Republicans who are weighing another effort to repeal the Obama-era Affordable Healthcare Act.

“I’m afraid (the Republicans) come back with health care reform,” the governor added. “I think we’re in the eye of the storm, where it’s apparently quiet right now on health care. I think the back half of the storm is going to come around.”

Single-payer — the concept that everyone chips in to cover “free” health care coverage when someone needs it — recently gained the support of U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and is a point on which Democrats seeking office next year are touting.

Yet while federal legislation is going nowhere in a Republican-controlled Congress, New York Democrats have pushed for a single-payer system on the state level. The Assembly, which is controlled by Democrats, has passed single-payer legislation repeatedly in recent years. The GOP-held state Senate has not taken up the issue.

Cuomo seemed open to single-payer on the state level, assuming that federal health care funding funneled to the state is maintained. He has bemoaned a proposal that would force the state to pick up the county share of Medicaid costs, lest it risk losing federal funding of an equal amount.

“If they were to pass it and it was not incongruous with what the federal government would do to us, I think it’s a very exciting possibility,” Cuomo said. “But I think it’s going to be a federal play. Our funding system basically relies on Medicaid from the feds. If they turn off that valve or slow that valve, there is no way we’re going to be able to make that up in this state no matter what.”

It’s worth noting that the state would have to raise an estimated $91 billion in revenues to fund a state-level single-payer system, according to Assembly sponsor Dick Gottfried, D-New York. According to Gottfried’s bill, any revenue proposal would need to account for ending of local payments for Medicaid.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a potential Democratic candidate for president in 2020, a year when single-payer may be a key issue for a White House run. On the heels of his trip to the U.S. Virgin Islands on Friday to survey hurricane damage, Cuomo was asked on Lehrer’s program if he is taking actions with an eye toward 2020.

“Once you start with this presidential question, whatever you do, you can interpret as ‘he’s doing that because he wants to run for president,'” Cuomo said. “Whatever I do they could say that.”

He added: “The Virgin Islands, I don’t even believe they vote for president. So if you’re running for president, there are a lot of other places to go besides the Virgin Islands — like Florida would probably be where you would have gone.”

Vice News: Inside the Long, Impossible Fight for Socialized Medicine in the US

By Harry Cheadle, August 7

Irene Aguilar knew for a long time that America’s healthcare system was broken. She had worked as a doctor in one of Colorado’s “safety net” hospitals, where the uninsured and seriously ill go for care. Some of her patients were there because they had lost insurance after being laid off, others lost insurance because they divorced a spouse whose job had been providing it. Who qualified for insurance-covered care could seem cruel and nonsensical. The “classic example,” she told me, were diabetics who wound up on dialysis because they couldn’t afford the medications that would let them manage their condition.

“Once you’re on dialysis, you automatically qualify for Medicare. I was furious that I had patients who had worked all their lives and they end up on dialysis and they can’t work anymore and we give them full coverage,” she said. “It seems so fiscally irresponsible that we didn’t help them control diseases and prevent high-cost complications that would lead to premature death—but once they had those complications we paid for them.”

Podcast: Making the Case for the NY Health Act

Making the Case for the New York Health Act

 “City & State NY Debate” Shows that an Improved Medicare-for-All Single Payer System Would Guarantee Coverage for All New Yorkers and Save 98% Money on Health Care Costs

Dear friends,

Earlier this week, I participated in a podcast debate hosted by the media outlet City and State New York  on the New York Health Act, my bill to establish an “improved Medicare for all” single-payer health plan to provide universal coverage to every New York resident, regardless of wealth, income, age or health status (A.4738, Gottfried/S.4840. Rivera).  Opposing me in the debate was Bill Hammond of the Empire Center, a conservative Albany-based think tank.  I think you’ll find the debate informative and interesting, which is why I’m sharing it with you today.

Oneonta Daily Star – In Our Opinion: Single-payer health care plan makes a lot of sense

July 5

Let’s face it, you don’t understand all the nuances of Obamacare or the various Republican plans to replace it.

Don’t feel bad. Neither do we.

Like you, however, we can easily figure out that a Republican scheme that would take health insurance away from more than 20 million Americans over the next 10 years and remove $800 billion or so from Medicare funding isn’t going to be particularly popular.

That’s why only 12 percent of Americans support the GOP plan, according to the USA TODAY/Suffolk University poll released Friday.

Journal-News: ‘Medicare-for-all’ single-payer plans reignited by GOP’s Obamacare rollback

By Barrett Newkirk and David Robinson, June 23

As Republicans push reforms reducing the government’s role in health care, some opponents are emboldened in their support for the opposite approach, one that greatly increases the government-health care link.

Progressive politicians and activists see a future in single-payer health care, the term for a government-run health insurance program that would be available to any American. While a Democratic-backed federal bill has no future in the GOP-led Congress, backers have had more success at the state level.

Broadway World – Stage Directors and Choreographers Society Takes a Stand on Health Care Reform

June 20, 2017

The Executive Board of SDC, the theatrical union representing Stage Directors and Choreographers across the United States, unanimously voted to endorse the New York State Health Act (S4840) and the New York Health Program (A4738), sister bills designed to establish universal single-payer health care for all New York residents.

SDC’s endorsement of S4840 and A4738 is combined with a rejection of H.R. 1628 (AHCA), the GOP sponsored bill that passed the House of Representatives in May. The AHCA will reverse the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act and is estimated to remove health care coverage from over 20 million Americans, discriminate against preexisting conditions, allow states to opt out of coverage like maternity care, and defund Planned Parenthood.